Wee Care Pediatrics, PLLC
Frequently Asked Questions


Most general questions regarding health care can be answered here. However, many of the questions that parents have regarding their child's health care are more complex and require that certain variables be known to the heath care provider in order to be answered accurately. Never hesitate to contact us regarding your child's health. We are more than happy to accommodate you. With any questions please call our office at 
315-699-9595.
 
 

When is a Fever Dangerous? 
Fevers are a positive sign that the body is mobilizing its immune system to fight off an infection. Most fevers are beneficial and harmless, although they may cause discomfort and irritability in children. We recommend not treating fevers unless the child is extremely irritable or uncomfortable. A fever is dangerous if it persists in the high range of 104- 105 and the child is extremely irritable or lethargic. Persistent fevers in this higher range are more likely to indicate a bacterial infection and therefore require a prompt evaluation. A fever is also dangerous and an emergency when it is greater than 101.0 F (or a temperature less than 97.0 F) in a child under 2 months old. If a baby in this age group has a rectal temperature that is greater than 101.0 F, please call the office immediately. It should be noted that fevers are always higher in the late afternoon and evening. We advise that any child (older than 6 months) that is uncomfortable with a fever be treated with Tylenol or Ibuprofen. If a high fever persists, the child should be seen for an evaluation. 

What are Some Essential Points of Newborn Care?
If breastfeeding, we recommend feeding 5 minutes a side up to a maximum of 20 minutes total for one feed. In other words, feed 5 minutes on the right side and break. Then feed 5 minutes on the left side and break. Repeat 5 minute feeding from each side and then stop. Do not keep the baby on the breast more that 20 minutes at one time. It is fine to bottle feed and to breastfeed at the same time unless the baby has obvious discomfort from ingesting certain formulas. Use alcohol to clean the cord with every diaper change. Try to avoid using lotions and wipes on the baby because an early introduction to such substances might lead to early allergies.Constipation in a baby is defined by a very hard stool that is passed. A normal bowelhabit may be 6-7 movements a day to one 6-7 days apart.

How Does One Recognize a Very Sick Child? When Should I Call for Help?
While each child is different, there are a few things that should alert you that your child is sick and needs attention. 
1.Extreme lethargy or extreme irritability. Any child that is extremely lethargic and not alert (limp or like a wet dishrag) or irritable (can not be consoled) 
2. Any fever that is above 104 F that persists with the above 
3. Not drinking and not urinating (wetting diapers) for greater than 6 hours 
4. Any sudden changes in behavior or disposition 
5.Any symptoms which last over a week (probably needs an appointment)
6. If you (the parent) are worried or unsure of yourself

Where Should I Take My Child for After Hours Care?
If you feel that your child needs medical treatment when the office is not open, please call our oncall triage number 855-599-6739. In most cases, we recommend any severely ill child be evaluated at the Galisano Pediatric Emergency Room, as it is staffed by pediatricians.
 

What Do I Do if My Child is Ill at The Time of a Scheduled Physical? 
If your child comes in for a well visit and is ill, he or she will be seen for the presenting illness and the physical will need to be rescheduled. If a child is sick, we can not call it a well-child visit!

Why Must I Make a Follow-up Appointment?
Sometimes it is necessary to schedule a follow-up appointment so we can make sure your child is recovering appropriately. A follow-up appointment ensures that your child is responding favorably to the prescribed treatment and that there are no complications. Your cooperation in keeping these appointments is very important to us, and to the good health of your child. Sometimes it is necessary to schedule a follow-up appointment so we can make sure your child is recovering appropriately. A follow-up appointment ensures that your child is responding favorably to the prescribed treatment and that there are no complications. Your cooperation in keeping these appointments is very important to us, and to the good health of your child.

Why won't Wee Care Pediatrics prescribe medicine over the phone? 
You could save me a co-payment if I don't have to bring my child in to be seen... 
We are in it for the well-being of your child! Prescribing medication without a visual and verbal evaluation could be dangerous for your child. An examination allows us to confirm the correct diagnosis. Second, other symptoms present and/or medical history of the child could determine how the illness should be treated. Dr. Terasaka wears many hats (pun intended) but he prefers to practice medicine without a blindfold on.
 
Why can't I treat a virus with an anti-biotic? My sister did.
Antibiotics do not treat viral infections they treat bacterial infections. A child may develop resistance to the antibiotic, especially if the treatments are not necessary leading to the risk that when they do have a true bacterial infection, then antibiotics may not work.
 
Hey, that child sneezed on the toy in the waiting room! How do you keep your toys clean?
Our office caters to both well and sick children. Unfortunately, germs are inevitable. Even though we routinely wash the toys, we aren't able to do so after every use. To remedy this situation, we provide a can of anti-bacterial wipes at the front counter for adults to use to sanitize the toys your child plays with before and after. We appreciate your assistance in keeping our toys germ free! 
 
 
What is the Wee Care policy on the prescribing of antibiotics and the use of medications?
As a rule of thumb, the less medication given the better. Wee Care recognizes that the body is best at fighting off illness and that all efforts should be made to help it do what it does best. In most cases, when a patient presents with a symptom (such as a fever, cough or runny nose) it is a sign that the body is trying to fight off an infection. It has been shown that, in most cases, infections cure in a shorter time when these symptoms are allowed to go untreated. Untreated fevers, for example, help the immune system to operate more efficiently in fighting off an illness, resulting in quicker cures. The principle is that it is always best to try to let the body deal with an illness with minimal medical intervention. Medications should not be used unless it is absolutely necessary. We will recommend certain medications when the situation dictates a need, such as a cough medicine for a cough that is keeping the family up all night. Antibiotics work against bacterial infections, but are not warranted for viruses such as the common cold. We request that the decision to use antibiotics be made by our prescribing staff.
 
Home
Wee Care Facebook
Patient Portal
News and Events
Frequently Asked Questions
Billing Policies
Office Policies
Wee Care Staff
Services
Location
Patient Portal Help
Marie's Book Corner